Informative Speech Outline – Template & Examples

Informative Speech Outline - Template & Examples featured image intro image

Informative speeches are used in our day-to-day lives without even noticing it, we use these speeches whenever we inform someone about a topic they didn’t have much knowledge on, whenever we give someone instructions on how to do something that they haven’t done before, whenever we tell someone about another person. Informative speaking is fairly new to the world of public speaking. Ancient philosophers like Aristotle, Cicero and, Quintilian envisioned public speaking as rhetoric, which is inherently persuasive.

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What is an Informative Speech?

An informative speech is designed to inform the audience about a certain topic of discussion and to provide more information. It is usually used to educate an audience on a particular topic of interest. The main goal of an informative speech is to provide enlightenment concerning a topic the audience knows nothing about. The main types of informative speeches are descriptive, explanatory, demonstrative, and definition speeches. The topics that are covered in an informative speech should help the audience understand the subject of interest better and help them remember what they learned later. The goal of an informative speech isn’t to persuade or sway the audience to the speaker’s point of view but instead to educate. The details need to be laid out to the audience so that they can make an educated decision or learn more about the subject that they are interested in.

It is important for the speaker to think about how they will present the information to the audience.  

Informative Speech Preparation

Close-Up of a Black Microphone

When you are preparing your informative speech, your preparation is the key to a successful speech. Being able to carry your information across to the audience without any misunderstanding or misinterpretation is very important.

Here Are Some Ways to Prepare For Your Speech

1. Choose Your Topic

Pick a topic where you will explain something, help people understand a certain subject, demonstrate how to use something.

2. Make a Thesis Statement

Think about what point you are trying to get across, What is the topic that you want to educate your audience on? “I will explain…” “I will demonstrate how to…” “I will present these findings…”

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3. Create Points That Support Your Thesis

Take a moment to think about what would support your thesis and take a moment to write the points down on a sheet of paper. Then, take a moment to elaborate on those points and support them. 

Typical Organization for an Informative Speech:

How to Speech: 4 Key steps to doing what you are talking about.

Example: Step One: Clean the chicken of any unwanted feathers and giblets. Step Two: Spice the chicken and add stuffings. Step Three: Set oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Step Four: Place chicken in the oven and cook for an hour. 

History/ What Happened Speech: Points listing from the beginning to the latest events that you want to discuss in your speech.

Example: First, Harry met Sally. Second, Harry took Sally out to the roadhouse. Third, Harry and Sally started their courtship. Fourth, Harry and Sally moved in together and adopted a dog named Paco.

What is it Speech: Two to Four main points that discuss the key elements of your subject.

Example: First, there must be four wheels. Second, the car’s engine must be functioning. Third, the doors must be functional. Fourth, in order to get to your destination, the car’s steering has to be functional.

Explain it Speech: Two to Four main points that go through the key elements of the topic to explain it.

Example: Firstly, the car drives by the engine that powers it to move forward. Secondly, by the wheels that rotate in a forward or backward motion. Thirdly, the car’s engine is powered by gas which gives it the ability to function and essentially move the car.

1. Develop Support For Your Thesis

Write down support for your points. Take some time to research your topic thoroughly. It is good to gather statistics, expert opinions, facts, and much more to make your speech unique and effective. 

There are three main types of support you should use to strengthen your speech: 

Interest Supports

Interest supports are used to increase the audience’s interest in the topic you are presenting.

  • Stories
  • Examples
  • Personal experiences
  • Interaction (e.g., Questions to the audience)

Evidence Supports

Evidence increases solid factual support in your speech. Examples of evidence supported are statistics, expert opinions, direct quotations. Studies, surveys, and facts.

Multimedia Aids

Multimedia aids such as posters with pictures and writing, DVDs, music or recordings on a stereo player, videotapes, and PowerPoint presentations.

2. Write Your Introduction And Conclusion

Write your introduction. Provide a quick attention getter, state your thesis, elaborate on why it is important to you and your audience. It is expected that you preview your main points in the introduction by listing all your main points of discussion in your introduction.

Write your conclusion. Tie the speech together, build to a higher point and give it a sense of conclusion.

3. Deliver The Speech

Practice your speech until you feel confident. Present your material as effectively as possible.

Informative Speech Outline

Woman Speaking in a Conference Room - Four People Smiling and Clapping

Creating an outline for an informative speech will help you organize your ideas and information to share with your audience in an effective manner. A well-planned outline will ensure that all the important information is included in your speech and ensure that you don’t wander off-topic.

Example of an Informative Speech Outline

Topic: This will be the title of your speech.

Purpose: To inform the audience about the topic.

Thesis: A theme statement that clearly describes the topic and points made in the presentation.

  1. Introduction
    1. Attention-grabbing opening statement
    2. Reason to listen to the speech
    3. Thesis statement
    4. Preview of points to be covered
  2. First main point
    1. First subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
    2. Second subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
  3. Second main point
    1. First subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
    2. Second subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
  4. Third main point
    1. First subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
    2. Second subpoint
      1. Supporting detail
      2. Supporting detail
  5. Conclusion
    1. Restatement of main points
    2. Restatement of thesis
    3. Concluding remarks

When developing an outline, follow these rules to ensure a successful speech:

  • Include one idea for every point, subpoint, or supporting detail.
  • If there is one point, there must be a second point. If there is one supporting point, there should be a second supporting point. 
  • Be consistent. If you are using full sentences to describe points and subpoints, use full sentences throughout the outline. Ensure that the verb tense is consistent throughout your outline as well.

Informative Speech Outline Examples

Man Holding a Book With the Words Information Written on it

Example 1

Topic: Adoption

Purpose: To inform people about adoption

Thesis: Adoption is the act of transferring parental rights and duties to someone other than the adopted person’s biological parents. The number of children adopted each year by American families is an estimate only.

  1. Introduction
    1. What do Edgar Allan Poe, John Lennon, Steve Jobs, and Eleanor Roosevelt all have in common? They were all adopted. Adoption is the act of transferring parental rights and duties to someone other than the adopted person’s biological parents. The adoption process is lengthy, expensive, and varies from country to country and even state to state. Not only does adoption vary from state to state, but sometimes the adoption process even varies within regions of a state.
    2. Many children get adopted every year. No one knows how adoption works.
    3. Adoption is a life-changing event, not just for the children involved but also for every single family made whole through adoption.
    4. Adoption processes vary from place to place. Types of adoption. Benefits and detriments to adoption. Many children who are adopted have experienced neglect and abuse.
  2. Adoption processes vary from place to place.
    1. The adoption process varies from state to state.
      1. It is more expensive in certain states than in others.
      2. The amount of paperwork throughout the process also depends on the state legislature.
    2. The adoption process varies within a state.
      1. In certain states, the adoption process is different from one region to the next.
      2. The process is different depending on the child protection laws set in each region inside a state.
  3. Types of adoption
    1. There are different types of adoption.
      1. There is step-parent or other family member adoption
      2. There is also adoption across state lines
    2. The more traditional adoption types are commonly known.
      1. There is private adoption which is most commonly found throughout the U.S.
      2. Adoption through foster care is a good thing to try for first-time adopters.
  4. The adoption process is expensive.
    1. There are a lot of upfront expenses.
      1. You are subjected to adoption agency fees to help you find a suitable match for your family.
      2. You also have to pay to adopt the child you want to adopt.
    2. There are a lot of big expenses in terms of the child too.
      1. Readying a living space to suit a child’s wants and needs can be expensive.
      2. Many new expenses come to light like healthcare, school, etc.
  5. Conclusion
    1. Adoption processes vary from state to state. There are many different types of adoption. Adoption can be expensive, so you have to ensure that you are financially capable of caring for another human being.
    2. Adoption is the act of transferring parental rights and duties to someone other than the adopted person’s biological parents. The number of children adopted each year by American families is an estimate only.
    3. Adoption is an absolutely life-changing adventure, but everyone needs to be more educated before walking into a demanding process. There will be many emotions, expenses, and frustration, but it truly is worth it in the end.

Example 2

Topic: Snakebites and how they’re treated

Purpose: To inform the audience of the dangers of snakes and how to respond to being bitten by a snake.

Thesis: Snakebites are dangerous and could ultimately lead to loss of life if not acted upon correctly.

  1. Introduction
    1. Imagine that you and your friend are walking in the woods, one sunny day in the fall when leaves cover the ground. Suddenly, your friend accidentally steps on a snake and gets bitten.
    2. Your friend’s chance of survival depends on your knowledge of acting promptly and taking proper measures in this situation.
    3. Today I will inform you about three common poisonous snakes seen in our country and explain to you the effects of a snake bite.
    4. Three poisonous snakes. Effects of the snake’s venom. How to administer first aid in the event of a snake bite.
  2. Three poisonous snakes
    1. There are two types of Rattlesnakes.
      1. William Pinkston: Responsible for more deaths in this country.
      2. Western diamondback: found from Texas to Eastern California.
    2. Copperhead and Cottonmouth
      1. Before striking, it opens its mouth wide to reveal its white inside.
      2. That’s how it got its name.
  3. The effects of snake venom on the human body
    1. Hepatotoxic
      1. Destroys blood vessels and red blood cells.
      2. Deadly and fatal to the victim.
    2. Neurotoxic
      1. It affects the optic nerves in the eyes, causing blindness.
      2. It affects the nerves controlling the respiratory muscles, causing suffocation and eventually leading to death if left untreated.
  4. How to administer first aid in the event of a snake bite.
    1. Immobilize the bitten area slightly lower than the heart.
    2. Apply a flat constricting band 2-4 inches above the bite.
    3. With a sterile scalpel or knife, make one incision that connects the fang marks.
    4. Squeeze venom gently from the incision with your fingers for 30 minutes.
    5. Get the victim to the hospital as soon as possible.
  5. Conclusion
    1. Three poisonous snakes. Effects of the snake’s venom. How to administer first aid in the event of a snake bite.
    2. Snake bites are dangerous and could ultimately lead to loss of life if not acted upon correctly.
    3. Snake bites are dangerous and could ultimately lead to loss of life if they are not cared for properly, and the victim doesn’t get the necessary treatment in time.

Conclusion

Informative speeches have one main goal: to inform the audience of a specific topic of interest. For you to have an effective and successful informative speech, it is important to do your research and draw up an informative speech outline. The speech outline ensures that you do not wander off topic or get carried away with one point. 

If, on the other hand, you have to prepare persuasive speech, we have a guide on outlining and preparing for it the right way right here.

Cite this article as: Jim Peterson, "Informative Speech Outline – Template & Examples," in My Speech Class, March 17, 2022, https://www.myspeechclass.com/informative-speech-outline.html.